Hepatitis is a common viral infection in the hospital population, especially with liver failure patients. There are a variety of strains of hepatitis, some acute and some chronic in nature. The most common type that I have seen in the ICU is Hepatitis C with chronic liver disease patients. When patients are in the ICU, their liver failure is generally very advanced requiring more palliative treatment.  What causes this destruction of the liver? How do we prevent this from happening?

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AuthorCourtney Tracy
CategoriesPhysiology

The process of declaring brain death and then donating organs is one that is very interesting to many nurses (including myself).  How exactly is brain death declared?  How does the process of donating organs work? I interviewed Tony Hume, a nurse from New Mexico, who has a great deal of experience with these situations to help answer these questions.

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AuthorCourtney Tracy

Does DKA have a confusing pathophysiology? Why does the potassium rise initially? How does insulin help to resolve DKA? Why do these patients breathe so fast? If you've wondered about these questions, look at this article to see if it helps clear up some of the confusion!

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AuthorCourtney Tracy
CategoriesPhysiology

When patients are bleeding from their eyes, mouth, catheter, IV sites, and more...what do you start to think? You should automatically think disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC).  This looks like something you would see in the Hollywood version of the ICU, except that it actually happens. Check out this summary of what DIC is, written by an ICU RN.

Posted
AuthorCourtney Tracy
CategoriesPhysiology