As a nurse, you may encounter an array of mobility issues across a span of different kinds of patients. In fact, the most recent data from the Centers for Disease Control says that almost 40 million adults in the U.S. experience some degree of difficulty with physical functioning, with over 17 million reporting being unable to walk a quarter mile.

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AuthorCourtney Tracy

Here in New Mexico we have many rattlesnakes slithering around. Have you ever encountered one of these in your path? I once cared for a patient who had a rattlesnake on her front lawn and she tried to shoo it away. Obviously this didn't go well because she became my patient later that night! What do you do if someone has been bit by a rattlesnake?

As a nurse, one common infection you will encounter with patients is bound to be urinary tract infection (UTI). Studies suggest that upwards of 40% to 50% of all women will contract UTI at some point in their lives and that over 8 million people visit a healthcare provider each year for UTI. Understanding its causes, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment can help you provide even better care to your patients who may develop one.

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AuthorCourtney Tracy

Hepatitis is a common viral infection in the hospital population, especially with liver failure patients. There are a variety of strains of hepatitis, some acute and some chronic in nature. The most common type that I have seen in the ICU is Hepatitis C with chronic liver disease patients. When patients are in the ICU, their liver failure is generally very advanced requiring more palliative treatment.  What causes this destruction of the liver? How do we prevent this from happening?

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AuthorCourtney Tracy
CategoriesPhysiology

People suffering from multiple sclerosis have a variety of symptoms that they experience.  As a nurse, it's important to understand these symptoms and how we can help these individuals.  Jessica from ViveHealth.com put together this great article about the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of MS.

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AuthorCourtney Tracy

We have heard time and time again that getting vaccinated increase the risk for developing autism.  In the last few years, there has been new information that has shown that this is not the case.  Autism Speaks put out this great article talking about different studies that have shown that there isn't an increased risk of autism from getting vaccinated, it might actually decrease the risk.

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AuthorCourtney Tracy